Blog topic: Rare books

Mount Broderick and Nevada Fall, Yosemite

Newly Released: Carleton Watkins photographs

March 8, 2017

Carleton Watkins (1829-1916) photographed some amazing landscapes throughout California and the broader West Coast, especially in Yosemite. Originally from New York, the gold rush drew Watkins to California in 1851. While he failed to strike it rich in gold, Watkins became involed in photography and became a well known landscape photographer. Stanford has newly released some of these digitized landscapes from three works by Watkins: Photographs of the Pacific coastPhotographs of the Columbia river and Oregon, and Photographs of the Yosemite Valley. Find a sampling below and we hope you'll browse through the full works as well!

Janet Sakai moving from Special Collections to Acquisitions

January 13, 2016
by Glynn Edwards
After many productive years in the Department of Special Collections & University Archives, Janet Sakai is moving to a new position in Acquisitions. Janet joined us fourteen years ago as an administrative assistant to Roberto Trujillo, the Field Curator of Special Collections, but quickly demonstrated her talents as a cataloger.
Joseph Goldyne exhibit poster

Joseph Goldyne: Books, Prints & Proofs opens in Green Library Bing Wing

September 21, 2015
A new exhibition on the second floor of the Green Library Bing Wing features the work of artist Joseph Goldyne, whose unique small-format prints using intaglio printmaking processes are credited with reviving the art of the varied edition monoprint beginning in the late 1970s. After earning a medical degree at UCSF (1968), Goldyne turned his full attention to art and never looked back. His work is informed by his study and documentation of human anatomy as well as his near-encyclopedic knowledge of art history, credentialed by a graduate degree in fine arts from Harvard.
 
Aldine Greek Bible 1518

A large collection of early printed leaves

July 10, 2015

Stanford University Libraries is the grateful recipient of a very generous donation of some 700 individual leaves from early printed books, the gift of Donn Faber Downing and Letitia Leigh Sanders. The vast majority of these leaves are from books from the 15th and 16th centuries and serve not only as examples of which texts were being printed with this “new” technology (Gutenberg’s Bible was printed about 1455, the first book printed in the western world with moveable type) but also how these texts were presented: their typefaces, page layout, and format.  It is a remarkable, rich collection, and will be used in a wide variety of classes.

The Queen of the Night, detail from Mozart's Zauberflöte

Opern-Typen: opera meets the comics

January 12, 2016
by Ray Heigemeir

Opern-Tÿpen. Berlin : G. Kölle, [ca. 1882]

Opern-Tÿpen consists of six volumes of chromolithographic plates depicting scenes from 54 operas popular in 19th century Germany. Each opera plot has been distilled into a mere six frames, with liberally adapted accompanying text. The visual charms of Opern-Typen are evident. The plates reveal a sophisticated understanding of the effective use of line, gesture, and composition to convey drama and comedy in a tight narrative sequence. Future research may determine if these drawings captured or were informed by real-life performances, as is suggested by the inclusion of staging and scenic elements.

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