Blog topic: Born digital

Nazraeli Press, Deanna & Ed Templeton

Fall 2019 - Cataloging, Metadata & Processing Projects Underway in Redwood City (Part 1)

October 16, 2019
by Glynn Edwards

Part One - Regular Staff in Collection Services

The regular staff in the Collection Services arm of the Department of Special Collections & University Archives has finally unpacked from our last relocation in July and settled into our new space in Academy Hall on Stanford’s Redwood City campus. It is a great relief to see our cataloging, processing and digital units once again hard at work and various collections spread out in our workroom. As always, they, and all of those behind the scenes in Redwood City and our colleagues on campus, did a phenomenal job!

Logo for the Lighting the Way project

Lighting the Way: illuminating the future of discovery and delivery for archives

August 19, 2019
by M.A. Matienzo

We are pleased to announce Lighting The Way: A National Forum on Archival Discovery and Delivery, a year-long project running from September 1, 2019 to August 31, 2020, funded by the National Leadership Grants for Libraries program of the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Lighting the Way will convene a series of national meetings focused on enhancing discovery and delivery for archives and special collections. The project builds on current and past efforts at Stanford Libraries around archives and technology, including ArcLightePADD, and the AIMS project.

In October 2019, the project team will launch an open application and nomination process for a National Forum, scheduled for January 2020, dedicated to discussion and brainstorming about both current successes and challenges to effective archival discovery and delivery. Project funding includes participant support costs for archives, library, and technology workers interested in improving how user-facing systems that support archival discovery and delivery work together. Find out more about Lighting the Way, including information on the project team, its goals, and its expected outcomes on our project website.

Chinese Deathscape cover

CIDR project "The Chinese Deathscape" is published by Stanford University Press

March 20, 2019

The Stanford Libraries' Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR) is proud to share in the announcement of a new publication, by the Stanford University Press, of The Chinese Deathscape: Grave Reform in Modern China, a longstanding collaboration led the publication's editor, Professor Thomas S. Mullaney of the Department of History, and featuring custom design and software development primarily by former CIDR developer David McClure.

This publication is the latest in SU Press's Digital Scholarship series of interactive scholarly works, and the first fully peer-reviewed and professionally published of CIDR's many projects in the digital humanities and computational social sciences.

ePADD 7.0 beta 1 now available

The ePADD development team is thrilled to announce the release of ePADD 7.0 beta 1.

ePADD is free and open source software developed by Stanford Libraries' Special Collections & University Archives that uses natural language processing and machine learning to support archival appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery for email of potential historical or cultural value.

Experimenting with ePADD: finding strategies for screening and processing email

August 2, 2018
by Sally DeBauche

I’m excited to make my debut post in my new role as the Digital Archivist for Special Collections!  Since I’m the newest member of team ePADD I thought it would be only fitting to write my inaugural post on the subject of email.  I recently worked with the email contained in the Robert Creeley papers and it gave me the opportunity to experiment with the ePADD software and find some effective strategies for processing email.  Working on this project also gave me a chance to think a little more deeply about how we process email and how we document the decisions that we make

ePADD logo

ePADD 5.1 released!

We are very excited to announce the release of ePADD 5.1! ePADD is free and open-source computational analysis software developed by Special Collections & University Archives and partners, that facilitates screening, browsing, and access for historically and culturally significant email collections.

Read on for more about the release, and the latest news from the project team.

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