Blog topic: Born digital

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Just published: Final report of the Lighting the Way project

November 29, 2021
by Mark A. Matienzo

The Lighting the Way project team is pleased to announce the publication of Facilitating and Illuminating Emergent Futures for Archival Discovery and Delivery: The Final Report of the Lighting the Way Project.  Lighting the Way focused on exploring how networks of people and technology impact archival discovery and delivery (how people find, access, and use material from archives and special collections) and focused on engaging directly with practitioners – archives, library, and technology workers – involved in this work, across roles, job functions, areas of expertise, and levels of positional power. Through a series of in-person and virtual events, the project applied participatory, generative facilitation methods to allow participants to develop future-oriented visions of how to transform archival delivery while also bringing their own experience to bear. The final report is available through the Stanford Digital Repository at its DOI (doi:10.25740/jm302fq5311) and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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Announcing The Lighting the Way Handbook

November 1, 2021
by Mark A. Matienzo

The Lighting the Way project team is pleased to announce the publication of The Lighting the Way Handbook: Case Studies, Guidelines, and Emergent Futures for Archival Discovery and Delivery, edited by Mark A. Matienzo and Dinah Handel. It represents the synthesis of the work of participants in the Lighting the Way Working Meeting, a practitioner-focused strategic thinking opportunity intended to explore topics related to archival discovery and delivery. The Lighting the Way Handbook includes case studies on work at specific institutions, chapters exploring the impact of standards and best practices on archival discovery and delivery, and descriptions of emergent opportunities that advocate for new programmatic work, as well as an introduction that contextualizes the chapters, draws thematic connections between them, and provides concrete recommendations about how to advance work on archival discovery and delivery.

Ted Nelson email archive now available

Stanford Libraries’ Department of Special Collections is excited to announce that the email archive of Ted Nelson is now available to researchers. Theodor Holm "Ted" Nelson is an information technology pioneer and systems humanist who began his work in these areas in the 1960s. Nelson founded Project Xanadu, a global hypertext system designed to permanently connect different types of documents. He also coined the terms hypertext and hypermedia. The Ted Nelson email archive contains 236,779 messages related to Nelson’s life and work between 2001-2019, covering his more recent work.

Launching the new Shared ePADD Discovery Module

The ePADD Project Team and the ePADD Discovery Consortium is excited to announce the launch of a new shared ePADD Discovery websiteePADD, the free and open source software for appraisal, processing, and providing access to email archives, developed by Stanford Libraries provides a stand alone email Discovery Module that can be hosted on a public web server.

Shah Commission of Inquiry Report 1, page 1

LEGACIES OF CONFLICT in South Asia: The Right to Heal

How many of us first developed an understanding of the Indian subcontinent and its peoples from the writings of Vikram Seth, Salman Rushdie or Rohinton Mistry? Their stories, A Suitable Boy, Midnight's Children and A Fine Balance, introduced the rest of the world to the socio-political tensions fomenting in India since its independence from Britain in 1947.

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Launching the Lighting the Way working meeting

April 20, 2021
by Mark A. Matienzo

The Lighting the Way project team is happy to announce the launch of the Working Meeting, a series of online meetings and facilitated activities held in April and May 2021. The Working Meeting focuses on convening small groups to develop a topic related to improving archival discovery and delivery into a written contribution of 5-10 pages to be published by the project this summer. Building on the work of the Lighting the Way Forum, the four sessions of the Working Meeting leverages the Liberating Structures framework and other proven techniques from human-centered design to provide a welcome and supportive environment for collaboration.

Our first session was held on Monday, April 19, 2021, and we are pleased to introduce you to the groups, participants, and facilitators that will be collaborating over the next six weeks and beyond. We will share more as our work progresses throughout and after the Working Meeting.

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